Astro-Chat: Black Holes

Science views

an astro-chat with

Professor Don Kurtz

Visiting Professor, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Lincoln, UK

Friday, 11 February 2022

7:00-8:00 pm

Live online

Book a place

Small black holes with masses “only” 5-10 times the mass of the Sun form in supernova explosions at the ends of the short lives of the most massive stars. This is gravity at its most extreme. We cannot see a black holes; no light can escape from them. That’s why they are black. But we can, and do, detect them from their tug on other stars and on gas. That now even allows them to be seen in silhouette with the “Event Horizon Telescope”. Black holes do not “suck” things in. But if you get too close to a small one, its tides will tear you to your constituent particles. Down in the hearts of galaxies small black holes encounter and swallow…

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